News & Events
Stay up to date with the latest from Buck's T-4
Buck’s Restaurant Closes April 10-May 26

Thanks for a great season! While we always offer our full hot breakfast, included in all room rates, to hotel guests, the restaurant at Buck’s T-4 will close for dinner service from April 10-May 26. We’re hard at work developing some cool new items for the summer menu. Keep an eye on our Facebook page for previews and tasting opportunities. For group catering inquiries during this time, please contact Valerie Edwards at 406-581-3330. The office can always be reached at 406-995-4111. See You This Summer!

Comments: 0
Buck’s Returns to Washington D.C. for the Democratic Governor’s Conference

Chef Scott Mechura with Governor Bullock On the road again with the Buck’s team Buck’s Chef (Scott) and Owner (Chuck) were invited for the second time to Washington D.C. for the Democratic Governor’s Conference, and to help raise awareness for No Kid Hungry and Share Our Strength.  By Chef Scott Mechura A chef’s day to day grind can often get monotonous. We create and prepare great food and experiences, but one of the most important factors to our repertoire is consistency. That consistency can at times get shrouded in boredom. But once in a while, you get to be a part of something that turns all of the minutia upside down. About two weeks ago I attended the DGA conference in Washington DC along with Chuck, one of our owners, and Valerie Edwards, our Director of Sales and Marketing. For Chuck and I, it was a return visit, as we were fortunate enough to be invited back for a second consecutive year. I say fortunate because they only invite 10 chefs from Democratic states, and rarely ever invite a chef a second time. I say fortunate because while this is in fact a democratic event, the platform for this particular event is Share […]

Comments: 0
BUCK’S T-4 ANNOUNCES NEW ADDITION TO LEADERSHIP TEAM

Jeremiah Dawson to Manage Historic Big Sky Restaurant Big Sky, MT, February 22, 2016– Big Sky’s historic Buck’s T-4 Lodge owners Chuck Schommer and David O’Connor are pleased to announce the addition of Jeremiah Dawson to their senior leadership team. “We are proud to bring Jeremiah to the Big Sky community, and excited to add his skills and experience to our team”, said Co-Owner and Director of Food and Beverage Chuck Schommer. Jeremiah grew up in Big Timber, MT before pursuing his education in hospitality and the culinary arts at Johnson & Wales in Denver. He spent several years honing his management skills in country club settings in Denver and Lincoln, NE before returning to Montana. He earned both his Associate’s Degree in Culinary Arts and Bachelor’s in Resort Food & Beverage Management from Johnson & Wales. Jeremiah joins Buck’s T-4 as Dining Room Manager. His responsibilities will include coordinating all aspects of the service experience at Buck’s, as well as reservations, training and hiring for the nationally-recognized restaurant. He can usually be found greeting guests in the evenings in Buck’s newly completed restaurant entrance. He can be reached at 406-993-5222, or [email protected] Buck’s T-4 Lodge is known throughout Montana […]

Comments: 0
Interview with Executive Chef Scott Mechura

The following interview was made possible by the NW Tastemaker, a culinary travel publication forthcoming from Northwest Travel Magazine. To read more interviews with the best chefs in the Pacific Northwest, visit Northwest Travel Magazine and TableTalkNorthwest.com. With a history dating back to 1946, Bucks T-4 Lodge is one of the most famous dining options is Montana, and the historic restaurant is known for preparing local game, such as antelope and bison, using traditional European cooking techniques. Think Cast Iron Seared Red Deer Loin with maple gratin, foraged mushroom conserva and apple jam, and Southwest Montana Raised Rainbow Trout with oyster mushrooms, creamed kale, red quinoa and lemon-sage olive oil. In addition to these game-centric dishes, Bucks T-4 Lodge also serves a host of burgers, quesadillas, and, even, bahn mi. With a history dating back to 1946, Bucks T-4 Lodge is one of the most famous dining options is Montana, and the historic restaurant is known for preparing local game, such as antelope and bison, using traditional European cooking techniques. Think Cast Iron Seared Red Deer Loin with maple gratin, foraged mushroom conserva and apple jam, and Southwest Montana Raised Rainbow Trout with oyster mushrooms, creamed kale, red quinoa and lemon-sage olive oil. […]

Comments: 0
Buck’s T-4 Director of Sales Recognized

Valerie Edwards, our Director of Sales, was recently recognized for her commitment to excellence and service to her guests by the Montana Lodging & Hospitality Association. The MTLHA awarded Val the 2015 “Montana Hospitality Sales Professional of the Year” at their statewide annual convention in Kalispell. The recipient is selected each year as one who demonstrates not only excellence in their profession, but also for service to the community, civic achievements and other quality traits. The award is voted on by peers in the industry. A recent graduate of the prestigious Leadership Bozeman” program, Valerie embodies the leadership qualities that make us so proud of our management team.  

Comments: 0
Amuse Bouche: A Brief History of Beer from Executive Chef Scott Mechura

Enter beer, also a fermented beverage using yeast to ferment sugars – in this case malted barley – and water. Once harvested, barley isn’t ready to go the way grapes are. It needs to be malted. Malting begins with soaking the barley in water to germinate the endosperm, then heating and drying it to stop the germination. The final malting step involves the desired roasting time and temperature. Different temperatures and schedules for each variety of barley, the country of origin, and the time of year make for additional variances.

Comments: 0
Amuse Bouche: Our Culinary Roots from Executive Chef Scott Mechura

In America, we tend to have a myopic view of food and its origins, but as a nation comprised mostly of non-indigenous people, it stands to reason we have adopted ingredients and cuisines from all over the globe.

But every place tells a similar story about food origins. Here are a few misconceptions:

Comments: 0
Crabapple Picking in the Gallatin Valley Autumn

Just about 5 years ago to the date, I attended a jam and jelly making class, put on by Blue Chair Fruit‘s Rachel Saunders.  This class changed my life forever (Kris describes it as “possessed”).  That fall, I purchased a freezer full of local fruit while in season. I made jams, jellies, marmalades, butters, sauces–you name it. Every waking moment I was thinking about what I could put in a jar next. Every day off all winter long our house smelled just like grandma’s on a Sunday. So fast forward. I finally realized I missed one important part of Rachel Saunders’ class.  Rachel preached “pick what is in season and process it when it is in its prime and ripe”.  So now I try to pick and process as much as possible while fresh.  Ok, I still have fruit that I freeze, but let’s face it, “in-season” tends to happen all at once in Montana. Here is a recent foraging excursion Kris and I went on two weeks ago, and the fruits of our labor.   The trees were loaded this year, and in no time at all we had 25 lbs of tart little crab apples. Now starts the discussion about what to make? I am […]

Comments: 2
Amuse-Bouche: Is Gluten Free A Trend? from Executive Chef Scott Mechura

I see food trends come and go, and in chefs’ circles we often try to predict how long a particular trend will last. We usually all agree: not very long. And we’re usually right.

The gluten-free diet seems to be front and center as the current haute food trend. As a chef, I initially believed it to be just that, a trend. But maybe now it’s time to eat crow.

Comments: 0
Amuse-Bouche: The Latest Bite from Executive Chef Scott Mechura

In America, we tend to have a myopic view of food and its origins, but as a nation that is comprised of many non-indigenous people, it stands to reason we have adopted ingredients and cuisines from all over the globe. Even right here at home, Native American diets, like most peoples, varied regionally, but three ingredients (affectionately know as the “three sisters”, remained staples throughout the entire future United States: Squashes, beans, and corn (corn and it’s history is worthy of a whole entire conversation on its own). But every continent tells a similar story…

Comments: 0

Best of Montana in Winter Food & Drink. Read the Article